Photography

Wilbur Hills, 2014

The photograph above is from the body of work I am producing now. More here: Boundaries of Eden.

 

Accordion Scroll:  This series of three dimensionally constructed photographic pieces with kinetic qualities led to the Boundaries of Eden work. Each piece is constructed from two different photographic prints that have been cut into strips; laid out in an ‘A/B’ pattern of alternating strips and assembled and adhered to a previously prepared paper folded into uniform folded pleats. In order to view the spliced together images, the viewer is compelled to move back and forth in front of the work. By moving to the extreme right or left of the piece, the viewer sees first one and then the other image. The experience of walking back and forth in front of these works suggests a narrative – a story.

Aix-en-Provence, accordion view, composite from right, center and left, 2011

Aix-en-Provence, accordion view, composite from right, center and left, 2011

aix_comp copyAbove is the same work, Aix-en-Provence, viewed only from the center postion. The work is 120.65 centimeters wide, by 57.8 centimeters high, and 2.5 centimeters in depth.

מחכה צדק נווה 2011 (Neve Tzedek, Tel Aviv), 22 ¾ in. height X 47 ½ in width X 1 in. depth

מחכה צדק נווה 2011 (Neve Tzedek, Tel Aviv), 22 ¾ in. height X 47 ½ in width X 1 in. depth

neve_tzedek_centerAbove is the same work, Neve Tzedek, viewed only from the center postion.The work is 120.65 centimeters wide, by 57.8 centimeters high, and 2.5 centimeters in depth.

 

Neuroanatomy Journal: This work reflects my life-long interest in science, medicine and relationships between mind/body:

Local graded changes in voltage

Local graded changes in voltage, graphite applied to silver gelatin print, 36.8 centimeters wide by 50 centimeters high

Potassium equilibrium potential,

Potassium equilibrium potential, graphite applied to silver gelatin print,  36.8 centimeters wide by 50 centimeters high

inhibitory synaptic potentials,

Inhibitory synaptic potentials, graphite applied to silver gelatin print,  36.8 centimeters wide by 50 centimeters high

Note please, that a couple of  the photographs in this section will be considered by some to be problematic terms of the nudity. To my friends who for religious reasons find such images to be troublesome, I sympathize with your viewpoint, however the photos remain significant within my larger body of photographic work. 

The Body as Archive: These images were created at intervals over recent years. They are part of my continuing exploration/obsession of and with sunlight, it’s impact on human beings, and on the earth. In the works shown below I have utilized the surface of people’s bodies to create what are essentially ‘photograms.’ In other works also shown here, I have documented people who, on their own, selectively darkened (or ‘sun-tanned’) their skin.

Woman in Polka-Dot Bathing Suit

Woman in Polka-Dot Bathing Suit, Ultra-Violet Light Applied to Skin, documented with un-retouched color photography using color negative film, copyright 1997

Bi-Racial Portrait #1

Bi-Racial Portrait #1, Ultra-Violet Light Applied to Skin, documented with un-retouched color photography using color negative film, copyright 1996

Bi-Racial Portrait #2, Ultra-Violet Light Applied to Skin, documented with color photography using color negative film, copyright 2013

Bi-Racial Portrait #2, Ultra-Violet Light Applied to Skin, documented with color photography using color negative film, copyright 1996

reverse_tan

Reverse Tan, Ultra-Violet Light Applied to Skin, documented with un-retouched color photography using color negative film, copyright 1994

More on this work: Like photographic film, skin is a photosensitive emulsion. All but the darkest skin, subjected to sunlight, will colour and manifest a negative image faithful to the pattern of exposure. Where hair, limbs, clothing and lotions block and modulate ultraviolet rays, our ‘birthday suit’ remains relatively pale. Exposed skin – on the arm that hangs outside the driver’s compartment, or the belly splayed bare on the beach – reacts to the sun, and darkens. Our full body, light sensitive display system remembers and archives our work, play, costumes, location, and time.

Skin is the permeable locus between the interior self and culture. Early in the 20th century, the almost universal preference for relatively pale skin gave way to a vogue for suntanned, bronzed skin. Bodies were exposed. Women and men revelled in the hedonistic pleasure of ‘soaking up the rays,’ and in the process, discovered new ways to represent themselves to the world. Despite health warnings, tanning remains popular – outdoors and in. At a time when increasingly, we create virtual skins and avatars for ourselves, tanning our own ‘hides’ remains a compelling practice, for many.

Below images: From the series Jones Beach Portraits

Triple Exposure, Jones Beach Series

Triple Exposed Woman, Un-retouched color photography using color negative film, copyright 2013

Working Man

Working Man, Un-retouched color photography using color negative film, copyright 2013

 

Tie Burn

Tied Burn, Un-retouched color photography using color negative film, copyright 2013

In 2007 I was commissioned to create a calendar for the Leila Arboretum, in Battle Creek, Michigan. It was an extraordinary experience, mostly because it was up to me to convince the subjects of the calendar who were ‘real’ people who happened to be patrons or staff of the Arboretum, to pose nude for the calendar. Here you can see three pages of the calendar:LeilaCalendar  If you would like to see the rest, let me know!